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Genestra HMF Candigen Cream 1.8 oz (50 grams)

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Genestra HMF Candigen Cream- 1.8 oz (50 grams)

• Female probiotic cream • Ease of application for increased compliance • Human-sourced strains • Proprietary, non-pathogenic strains

HMF Candigen Cream provides two strains of Lactobacillus. The dosage recommended for Genestra Brands™ HMF Candigen Cream is to apply a thin layer of cream to the external vaginal area two to three times daily. One gram (1 g) of cream contains 8.0x107 CFU Lactobacillus acidophilus and 2.0x107 CFU Lactobacillus gasseri, in combination with 2.47 mg of garlic (Allium sativum) clove powder. For maximum benefits, HMF Candigen Cream should be used along with HMF Candigen vaginal ovules. Pharmax and GENESTRA BRANDS™ are probiotic science and innovation leaders, with over 20+ years of proven experience and an ongoing commitment to incorporate the safest and most effective strains that reflect the latest evidence-based research from human trials. Our probiotics are human-sourced strains, proven in human clinical trials and cover a comprehensive product range.

Additional product info: The microbial species that inhabit the vaginal tract play an important role in the maintenance of health, and prevention of infection. Despite the close proximity of the vagina to the anus, the diversity of microbes present in the vagina is much lower than in the gut. The reason for this lower diversity is still unclear, but may involve poor receptivity of the vagina, different nutrient availability compared to the gut, and competition with indigenous organisms. Factors such as hormonal changes (particularly estrogen), vaginal pH, and glycogen content can all affect the ability of lactobacilli, the dominating species, to adhere to epithelial cells and colonize the vagina. The menstrual cycle can also cause changes in the vaginal microbiota, with high concentrations of estrogen increasing adherence of lactobacilli to vaginal epithelial cells. With the decrease in estrogen levels associated with menopause, there is also a decrease in lactobacilli present in the vaginal tract of postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women are also more susceptible to urogenital infections, supporting the theory that colonization of the vagina by commensal lactobacilli serves as a protection from these pathogens (1).

Urogenital infections namely yeast vaginitis, bacterial vaginosis, and urinary tract infection remain a major medical problem. Although antimicrobial therapy is generally effective at eradicating these infections, there is still a high incidence of recurrence. The patient’s quality of life is affected and many women become frustrated by the cycle of repeated antimicrobial agents diminishing effectiveness due to increasing microbial resistance. There is good clinical evidence to show that the intestinal and urogenital microbial flora have a central role in maintaining both the health and well-being of humans (2). Oral administration of probiotic strains such as Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus fermentum(3),(4) Lactobacillus acidophilus (5) and topical administration (6), are used to replace or augment bacterial populations (7). A recent trial evaluated daily use of a combination of Lactobacillus and oestriol vaginal tablet containing 107 cfu Lactobacillus acidophilus daily for 6 days for restoration of vaginal flora in women with complaints of vaginal infections (bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis, trichomoniasis or fluor vaginalis). An increase in normal flora, combined with a decrease in pathogenic microorganisms was observed, with significant improvements over the placebo group (8). Another study demonstrated that intravaginal administration of exogenous selected strains of lactobacilli can restore a normal vaginal microbiota and can be used in treating bacterial vaginosis (9).

The use of garlic in traditional/alternative medicine and midwifery for treatment of vaginal yeast infections has been documented.




Nutritional Information

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