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Genestra Femagen Iron Plus 90 capsules

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Genestra Femagen Iron Plus- 90 capsules

 

• Multivitamin, mineral and herbal formulation • An antioxidant for the maintenance of good health, helps to form red blood cells and helps in their proper function, helps in tissue formation and wound healing (1) • Ideal for vegans • Convenient capsule format increase patient compliance

Femagen Iron Plus is a unique formula containing iron and synergistic nutrients such as Yellow Dock and Celandine. An antioxidant for the maintenance of good health. Helps the body to metabolize carbohydrates, fats and proteins; helps in tissue formation and wound healing; helps to produce and repair connective tissue; helps to form red blood cells and helps in their proper function; helps normal growth and development; Helps in the development and maintenance of bones, cartilage, teeth and gum; helps to prevent niacin, folate, vitamin B6, vitamin C, vitamin B12, iron and copper deficiencies (2). The capsules are 100% pure vegetable-sourced.

References: 1 NHPD Monograph on Multivitamin and Mineral. October 2007. 2 NHPD Monograph on Multivitamin and Mineral. October 2007.

Additional product info: Vitamin C at 6-2,000 mg per day is an antioxidant for the maintenance of good health, helps the body metabolize fats and proteins, helps in the development and maintenance of bones, cartilage, teeth and gums, helps in wound healing and helps in connective tissue formation (3). The B vitamins, folate, vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), and vitamin B12 (cobalamin) are important regulators of homocysteine metabolism in the body, and randomized controlled trials have demonstrated that supplementation with folate at doses up to 500 µg daily (natural dietary folate or the synthetic folic acid) alone or in combination with vitamins B6 and B12 significantly reduces blood homocysteine concentrations (4).

Previous studies have reported that high concentrations of homocysteine and lower concentrations of vitamin B6, B12, and folate increase the risk for cognitive decline and pathology in aging populations. Using an optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM) method and global gray and white matter volume after correcting for age, sex, body mass index, calorie intake, and education, a study showed that adults with greater vitamin B6 (27 mg total) intake had greater gray matter volume along the medial wall, anterior cingulate cortex, medial parietal cortex, middle temporal gyrus, and superior frontal gyrus, whereas people with greater B12 (63.2 µg total) intake had greater volume in the left and right superior parietal sulcus. This study provides intriguing results for the use of B vitamin intake on brain volume and adds to a growing literature on the inverse relationship between vitamin B6, B12, and folate (1927 µg total) on tHcy levels and the risks and effects of tHcy and vitamin intake on cognition and the brain in both pathological and non-pathological aging populations (5). Results of a study indicate that iron deficiency without anemia impairs favorable adaptation to aerobic exercise in iron-depleted, nonanemic women. In the study, forty-two iron-depleted (serum ferritin <16 ?g/l), nonanemic (Hb >12 g/dl) women (18–33 yr old) received 100 mg of ferrous sulfate (S) (20 mg elemental iron) or placebo (P) per day for 6 weeks in a randomized, double-blind trial. Iron supplementation increased serum ferritin and decreased transferrin receptors in the S compared with the P group. The S and P groups decreased 15-km time and respiratory exchange ratio and increased work rate during the 15-km time trial after training. The decrease in 15-km time was greater in the S than in the P group and could be partially attributed to increases in serum ferritin and Hb (6). Non-anaemic women with unexplained fatigue may benefit from iron supplementation as shown in a clinical study when oral ferrous sulphate (80 mg/day of elemental iron) was ingested daily for four weeks (7). Iron at 1.4 to 45 mg per day helps to form red blood cells and helps in their proper function (8). Copper at 65-8,000 g per day helps to form red blood cells and helps to produce and repair connective tissue (9).

References: 3 NHPD Monograph on Multivitamin and Mineral. October 2007. 4 Larsson SC, Männistö S, Virtanen MJ, Kontto J, Albanes D, Virtamo J. Folate, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, and methionine intakes and risk of stroke subtypes in male smokers. Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Apr 15;167(8):954-61. Abstract; Page 954, 2nd paragraph; Page 957, Discussion, 1st sentence 5 Erickson KI, Suever BL, Prakash RS, Colcombe SJ, McAuley E, Kramer AF. Greater intake of vitamins B6 and B12 spares gray matter in healthy elderly: a voxel-based morphometry study. Brain Res. 2008 Mar 14;1199:20-6. Page 1, Abstract; Page 2, Introduction, 1st paragraph; Page 3, last 2 paragraphs; Page 4, 2nd paragraph; Page 5, last 2 paragraphs

 




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